Learn to Avoid Common Adjective and Adverb Errors

  • September 23, 2022
No Comments

[ad_1]

There are three basic forms for adjectives and adverbs: the basic form, the comparative form, and the superlative form. There are two basic rules to remember when using adjectives and adverbs in the comparative and superlative forms.

Rule One: For positive comparisons, to form the comparative, -er and more are used, and to form the superlative, -est and most are used. For negative comparisons, to form the comparative, -er and less are used, and to form the superlative, -est and least are used.

Rule Two: When comparing two items with one-syllable words, use -er. When comparing two items with words of more than one syllable, use more or less before the word. Never use -er and more or less at the same time. When comparing three or more items with one-syllable words, use -est. When comparing three or more items with words of more than one syllable, use most or least before the word. Never use -est and most or least at the same time.

Positive Comparisons: One-syllable words
Basic Form: tall
Comparative Form: tall + er = taller
Superlative Form: tall + est = tallest

Positive Comparisons: Words of more than one syllable
Basic Form: difficult
Comparative Form: difficult + more = more difficult
Superlative Form: difficult + most = most difficult

Negative Comparisons: One-syllable words
Basic Form: tall
Comparative Form: tall + less = less tall
Superlative Form: tall + least = least tall

Negative Comparisons: Words of more than one syllable
Basic Form: difficult
Comparative Form: difficult + less = less difficult
Superlative Form: difficult + least = least difficult

There are exceptions to the adjective and adverb rule. The adjectives good and bad and the adverbs well and badly do not follow the conventional rules for adjectives and adverbs in the comparative and superlative forms. The adjectives good and bad and the adverbs well and badly are irregular adjectives and adverbs, meaning they form the comparative and superlative differently than most other adjectives and adverbs.

For an easy way to remember when to use the adjectives good and bad and the adverbs well and badly in the comparative form, follow these rules. When comparing two items, use better or worse. Never use more and better or worse at the same time. When comparing three or more items, use best or worst. Never use most and best or worst at the same time.

Adjectives
Basic Form: good
Comparative Form: good = better
Superlative Form: good = best

Incorrect: The youngest child is a more better student than her eldest sibling.
Correct: The youngest child is a better student than her eldest sibling.

Basic Form: bad
Comparative Form: bad = worse
Superlative Form: bad = worst

Incorrect: The youngest child is a more worse student than her eldest sibling.
Correct: The youngest child is a worse student than her eldest sibling.

Adverbs
Basic Form: well
Comparative Form: well = better
Superlative Form: well = best

Incorrect: The youngest child plays piano more better student than her eldest sibling.
Correct: The youngest child plays piano better than her eldest sibling.

Basic Form: badly
Comparative Form: badly = worse
Superlative Form: badly = worst

Incorrect: The youngest child plays piano more worse student than her eldest sibling.
Correct: The youngest child plays piano worse than her eldest sibling.

There are two types of errors involving adjectives and adverbs in the comparative and superlative forms. One error occurs when both methods for forming the comparative and superlative forms are used-for example, using both -er and more or less to compare two items or using both -est and most or least to compare three or more items.

Incorrect: The youngest child is more taller than her eldest sibling.
Correct: The youngest child is taller than her eldest sibling.

Another error occurs when the comparative and superlative forms are used with the wrong number of items. The comparative form is used when two items are being compared. The superlative form is used when three or more items are being compared.

Incorrect: The banker made the more difficult decision in the bank’s history.
Correct: The banker made the most difficult decision in the bank’s history.

Following these basic rules for adjectives and adverbs in the comparative and the superlative forms will make using adjectives and adverbs hassle-free.

[ad_2]

Source by Katrina Williams

    About us and this blog

    We are a digital marketing company with a focus on helping our customers achieve great results across several key areas.

    Request a free quote

    We offer professional SEO services that help websites increase their organic search score drastically in order to compete for the highest rankings even when it comes to highly competitive keywords.

    Subscribe to our newsletter!

    More from our blog

    See all posts
    No Comments

      Leave a Comment